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Foundational Module

STEP 1
Team
Planning for healthy school communities works well if the workload is shared and all key groups are involved. It is essential that students, staff and school community members participate and that their ideas are respected.


QUESTION 1
Who is involved in completing the Healthy School Planner for your school? (Select the number of participants for each group)
  # of participants
a. Students   0     1     2     3+  
b. Teaching staff member(s)   0     1     2     3+  
c. Other staff member(s) (e.g., educational assistant, custodian, administrative assistant, etc.)   0     1     2     3+  
d. Principal / Vice Principal   0     1     2     3+  
e. School / parent council representative   0     1     2     3+  
f. Parents / families / guardians   0     1     2     3+  
g. Health services professionals   0     1     2     3+  
h. Community organization / non-profit organization representative   0     1     2     3+  
i. School district / division / board representative   0     1     2     3+  
j. Other   0     1     2     3+  

QUESTION 2
Does your school community have a leader for healthy school initiatives?
Yes
No
Don't know

STEP 2
Planning
Planning for a healthy school community involves using data from various sources to assist in identifying goals to work towards planning actions in each of the components of comprehensive school health in order to improve health and learning outcomes.


QUESTION 3
Has your school used data (e.g., surveys, attendance records, policy review) from the following to inform your action plan for creating a healthy school community?
  Yes No Don't know
a. Students
b. Teachers / Other staff
c. Parents / families / guardians
d. Formal review of policy or practice

QUESTION 4
Does your school develop goals that are specific, measurable, attainable, realistic and time limited within an action plan to create a healthier school community?
Yes, we develop goals with all above criteria
Yes, we develop goals without meeting all criteria
No
Don't know
Our school does not have an action plan

QUESTION 5
Does your school community communicate that "healthier students are better learners" with the following groups at least once a year?
  Yes No Don't know
a. Students
b. Teachers / Other staff
c. Parents / families / guardians
d. Groups outside the school (e.g., neighbourhood association, local businesses)


QUESTION 6
Does your action plan for a healthy school community include ways to:
  Not at all Minimally Somewhat Fully
a. Support students and staff in improving their well-being through teaching and learning (i.e., across the curriculum and inside and outside the classroom, staff professional development)
b. Foster a social environment at the school to enhance the well-being of the school community
c. Use the physical environment at the school to enhance the well-being of the school community
d. Develop or implement healthy school policies
e. Involve the broader school community to leverage community partnerships and services

STEP 3
Implementation across the 4 components of comprehensive school health
Teaching and Learning - Resources, activities and provincial/territorial curriculum where students gain age-appropriate knowledge and experiences, helping to build the skills to improve their health and wellbeing.

Through formal and informal curriculum and associated activities, students gain knowledge, understanding and skills to improve their health and well-being and enhance their learning outcomes.

Also includes professional development opportunities for staff related to health and well-being.

QUESTION 7
Beyond health and physical education classes, does your school encourage integration of health and well-being... (Select all that apply)
during instructional time (e.g., across curriculum)?
during non-instructional time (e.g., extra-curricular activities)?

QUESTION 8
Do students with a range of skills and characteristics (e.g., age, gender, ability, culture) play a leadership role in the organization of school activities?
In no activities (0-10%)
In some activities (11-50%)
In most activities (51-80%)
In all activities (81-100%)

STEP 3
Implementation across the 4 components of comprehensive school health
Physical Environment -

The physical environment is safe and accessible and supports healthy choices for all members of the school community.

The physical environment includes:

  • The buildings, grounds, play space, and equipment in and surrounding the school.
  • Basic amenities such as sanitation and air cleanliness.


QUESTION 9
How well do the following physical environments promote safety and / or injury prevention:
  Not at all Minimally Somewhat Fully
a. Outdoor spaces (e.g., adequate lighting, car-free zones, shade to promote sun safety)
b. Indoor spaces (e.g., facilities, equipment)
c. Air quality (e.g., temperature, free from mold)
d. Water quality (e.g., free from bacteria, taste, colour)

QUESTION 10
Do all members of your school community have equal and inclusive access during school hours to the following spaces?
  None Some Most All
a. Outdoor spaces
b. Indoor spaces (e.g., toilets, change rooms, desks, classrooms)

STEP 3
Implementation across the 4 components of comprehensive school health
Social Environment -

The social environment is:

  • The quality of the relationships among and between staff and students in the school.
  • The emotional well-being of students and staff.
  • Influenced by relationships with families and the wider community.

The school's social environment supports the school community in making healthy choices by building competence, autonomy, and connectedness.

Competency refers to our need for recognizing and using our personal gifts and strengths in achieving personal goals. Fulfilment of this need provides individuals with a sense of personal achievement and accomplishment.

Autonomy refers to our need for personal freedom to make choices or decisions that affect our lives. When this need is satisfied in conjunction with other need areas, freedom and choice are expressed in ways in which respect is demonstrated for self and others.

Connectedness refers to the extent to which students and staff perceive they are accepted, respected, included and supported by others in the educational environment.


QUESTION 11
Does your school community foster a safe and supportive environment for everyone?
Not at all
Minimally
Somewhat
Fully


QUESTION 12
Does your school community foster a respectful environment?
Not at all
Minimally
Somewhat
Fully

QUESTION 13
Does your school community foster a sense of connectedness:
  Not at all Minimally Somewhat Fully
a. within the school?
b. with the broader community?

QUESTION 14
Are staff supported to maintain and improve their personal health and well-being?
Not at all
Minimally
Somewhat
Fully

STEP 3
Implementation across the 4 components of comprehensive school health
Healthy School Policy - Management practices, decision-making processes, rules, procedures and policies at all levels that promote health and wellbeing, and shape a respectful, welcoming and caring school environment.

All school policies/guidelines and practices support learning outcomes while concurrently addressing healthy school initiatives in a planned, multi-faceted and integrative manner.



QUESTION 15
How frequently does your school engage the school community to review and update implementation of healthy school policies and practices (e.g., healthy eating policies, bullying policies)?
Never
Less than once a year
At least once per year
Don't know

QUESTION 16
Does your school use existing information or gather evidence to update implementation of policies and practices to create a healthy school community (e.g., district level reports, school satisfaction surveys, school accountability surveys)?
Not at all
Minimally
Somewhat
Fully

STEP 3
Implementation across the 4 components of comprehensive school health
Partnerships and Services -

The school collaborates with partners in the school community (e.g., families, community groups, businesses, non-governmental organizations, schools and school districts/divisions/boards, provincial/local/municipal governments, regional/local health authorities) to create and sustain a healthy school environment.

Partnerships are:

  • The connections between the school and students' families.
  • Supportive working relationships within schools (staff and students), between schools, and between schools and other community organizations and representative groups.
  • Health, education and other sectors working together to advance school health.

Services are:

  • Community and school based services that support and promote student and staff health and wellbeing.



QUESTION 17
Does your school have at least one effective partnership with the following individuals or groups to promote and sustain a healthy school environment?
  Yes No
a. Individuals / organizations within the school community (e.g., families, volunteers, parent council)
b. Other Schools
c. Community group(s) or non-governmental organization(s)
d. Business(es)
e. Government at any level
f. Health authority/health region
g. Other

QUESTION 18
Thinking of the "effective partnerships" identified in the previous question, which of the following supports have your partnerships provided in the last 12 months? (Select all that apply)
Funding
Services (e.g., health services, volunteer activities, training opportunities, professional development)
Material resources (e.g., handouts, signage, computers, equipment)
None of the above
Other


QUESTION 19
How many of your school community members (staff, students) are engaged in community service through your school (e.g., promoting community events, promoting or coordinating food drives, hosting blood donation clinics, raising money for charities)?
None (0-10%)
Some (11-50%)
Most (51-80%)
All (81-100%)

QUESTION 20
In a typical week, how often do community members (including parents) volunteer in your school? Volunteer activities do not have to be specific to health and well-being (think about all volunteers in your school).
Rarely
1 or 2 days per week
Most days
Every day

STEP 4
Celebrate!
Celebration of healthy school initiatives is an important part of instilling the concept and importance of health promoting schools in the minds of school students and staff, parents, the local community and senior officials.


QUESTION 21
How often does your school celebrate successful healthy school initiatives:
  Less than 1 time/year 1-2 time / year More than 2 times/year
a. Within the school (students and staff)?
b. With the broader community (families, other groups)?


QUESTION 22
Does your school community recognize, acknowledge and celebrate contributions of volunteers?
Not at all
Minimally
Somewhat
Fully

STEP 5
Sustaining your healthy school community
A successful health promoting school takes steps to sustain its efforts and achievements into the medium- and long-term.

QUESTION 23
How many school staff participated in learning opportunities (e.g., professional development, staff meetings, expert consultations) related to creating a healthy school community in the last 12 months?
None (0-10%)
Some (11-50%)
Most (51-80%)
All (81-100%)

QUESTION 24
How well has your school community prepared a succession plan (formal or informal) if your leader for healthy school initiatives was to leave (e.g., having shared leadership, vice-chair, mentorship for new leader candidates)?
Not at all
Minimally
Somewhat
Fully
Our school does not have a leader for healthy school initiatives


QUESTION 25
How many of your healthy school initiatives are implemented school wide?
None (0-10%)
Some (11-50%)
Most (51-80%)
All (81-100%)

QUESTION 26
Are your healthy school initiatives embedded within your school's action plan?
Yes
No
Don't know
Our school does not have an action plan

STEP 6
Monitoring & Evaluation
A successful health promoting school seeks continuous improvement to its planning and implementation of policies and practices reflecting a comprehensive school health approach through ongoing monitoring and evaluation.

QUESTION 27
How often does your school formally assess its progress on creating a healthy school community?
Less than one time per year
One time per year
More than one time per year
Conducted a school assessment but did not use results to plan or monitor progress


QUESTION 28
Rate the ease of navigating the following sections of the Healthy School Planner website by clicking on the number that corresponds with your rating:
  Completely
confusing
(1)
(2) (3) (4) No problems
at all
(5)
Not sure
a. Registration
b. HSP Questionnaire
c. School Report generation

QUESTION 29
What elements of completing the Healthy School Planner did you find valuable to your school? Check all that apply. (Select all that apply)
the process of bringing people together to complete the HSP as well as the ideas generated through team discussions
the resources
the recommendations
the action planning process

QUESTION 30
Would you recommend the Healthy School Planner to another school?
Yes
No
Maybe

Consent
Do you grant access to the data from this module of the Healthy School Planner so that aggregate results and secondary research and analysis can occur in support of policy and program planning?
Yes, I grant access for the use of data from this module.
(Note: The Pan-Canadian Joint Consortium for School Health and the University of Waterloo will ensure that findings cannot be linked to you or your school. Your school's data will be combined with data from other schools that have used the Planner, making your school's data indistinguishable from the others, and ensuring confidentiality.)
No, I do not grant access.